Industry Observations-Technical Insight-Vulnerabilities-Web Application Security

Saving Systems from SQLi

There is absolutely nothing special about the TalkTalk breach — and that is the problem. If you didn’t already see the news about TalkTalk, a UK-based provider of telephone and broadband services, their customer database was hacked and reportedly 4 million records were pilfered. A major organization’s website is hacked, millions of records containing PII are taken, and the data is held for ransom. Oh, and the alleged perpetrator(s) were teenagers, not professional cyber-criminals. This is the type of story that has been told for years now in every geographic region and industry.

In this particular case, while many important technical details are still coming to light, it appears – according to some reputable media sources – the breach was carried out through SQL Injection (SQLi). SQLi gives a remote attacker the ability to run commands against the backend database, including potentially stealing all the data contained in it. This sounds bad because it is.

Just this year, the Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report, found that SQLi was used in 19 percent of web application attacks. And WhiteHat’s own research reveals that 6 percent of websites tested with Sentinel have at least one SQLi vulnerability exposed. So SQLi is very common, and what’s more, it’s been around a long time. In fact, this Christmas marks its 17th birthday.

The more we learn about incidents like TalkTalk, the more we see that these breaches are preventable. We know how to write code that’s resilient to SQLi. We have several ways to to identify SQLi in vulnerable code. We know multiple methods for fixing SQLi vulnerabilities and defending against incoming attacks. We, the InfoSec industry, know basically everything about SQLi. Yet for some reason the breaches keep happening, the headlines keep appearing, and millions of people continue to have their personal information exposed. The question then becomes: Why? Why, when we know so much about these attacks, do they keep happening?

One answer is that those who are best positioned to solve the problem are not motivated to take care of the issue – or perhaps they are just ignorant of things like SQLi and the danger it presents. Certainly the companies and organizations being attacked this way have a reason to protect themselves, since they lose money whenever an attack occurs. The Verizon report estimates that one million records stolen could cost a company nearly $1.2m. For the TalkTalk hack, with potentially four million records stolen (though some reports are now indicating much lower numbers), there could be nearly $2m in damages.

Imagine, millions of dollars in damages and millions of angry customers based on an issue that could have been found and fixed in mere days – if that. It’s time to get serious about Web security, like really serious, and I’m not just talking about corporations, but InfoSec vendors as well.

Like many other vendors, WhiteHat’s vulnerability scanning service can help customers find vulnerabilities such as SQLi before the bad guys exploit them. This lets companies proactively protect their information, since hacking into a website will be significantly more challenging. But even more importantly, organizations need to know that security vendors truly have their back and that their vendor’s interests are aligned with their own. Sentinel Elite’s security guarantee is designed to do exactly that.

If Sentinel Elite fails to find a vulnerability such as SQLi, and exploitation results in a breach like TalkTalk’s, WhiteHat will not only refund the cost of the service, but also cover up to $500k in financial damages. This means that WhiteHat customers can be confident that WhiteHat shares their commitment to not just detecting vulnerabilities, but actively working to prevent breaches.

Will security guarantees prevent all breaches? Probably not, as perfect security is impossible, but security guarantees will make a HUGE difference in making sure vulnerabilities are remediated. All it takes to stop these breaches from happening is doing the things we already know how to do. Doing the things we already know work. Security guarantees motivate all parties involved to do what’s necessary to prevent breaches like TalkTalk.

Tags: sql injection, WhiteHat Security Statistics Report