Industry Observations-Vulnerabilities-Web Application Security-WhiteHat HackerKast

#HackerKast 8: Recap ofJPMC Breach, Hacking Rewards Programs and TOR Version of Facebook

After making fun of RSnake being cold in Texas, we started off this week’s HackerKast, with some discussion about the recent JP Morgan breach. We received more details about the breach that affected 76 million households last month, including confirmation that it was indeed a website that was hacked. As we have seen more often in recent years, the hacked website was not any of their main webpages but a one-off brochureware type site to promote and organize a company-sponsored running race event.

This shift in attacker focus has been something we in the AppSec world have taken notice of and are realizing we need to protect against. Historically, if a company did any web security testing or monitoring, the main (and often only) focus was on the flagship websites. Now we are all learning the hard way that tons of other websites, created for smaller or more specific purposes, happen either to be hooked up to the same database or can easily serve as a pivot point to a server that does talk to the crown jewels.

Next, Jeremiah touched on a fun little piece from our friend Brian Krebs over at Krebs On Security who was pointing out the value to attackers in targeting credit card rewards programs. Instead of attacking the card itself, the blackhats are compromising rewards websites, liquidating the points and cashing out. One major weakness that is pointed out here is that most of these types of services utilize a four-digit pin to get to your reward points account. Robert makes a great point here that even if they move from four-digit pins to a password system, they stop can make it more difficult to brute force, but if the bad guys find value here they’ll just update current malware strains to attack these types of accounts.

Robert then talked about a new TOR onion network version of Facebook that has begun to get set up for the sake of some anonymous usage of Facebook. There is the obvious use of people trying to browse at work without getting in trouble, but the more important use is for people in oppressive countries who want to get information out and not worry about prosecution and personal safety.

I brought up an interesting bug bounty that was shared on the blogosphere this week by a researcher named von Patrik who found a fun XSS bug in Google. I was a bit sad (Jeremiah would say jealous) that he got $5,000 for the bug but it was certainly a cool one. The XSS was found by uploading a JSON file to a Google SEO service called Tag Manager. All of the inputs on Tag Manager were properly sanitized in the interface but they allowed you to upload this JSON file which had some additional configs and inputs for SEO tags. This file was not sanitized and an XSS injection could be stored making it persistent and via file upload. Pretty juicy stuff!

Finally we wrapped up talking about Google some more with a bypass of Gmail two-factor authentication. Specifically, the attack in question here was going after the text message implementation of the 2FA and not the tokenization app that Google puts out. There are a list of ways that this can happen but the particular, most recent, story we are talking about involves attackers calling up mobile providers and social engineering their way into accessing text messages to get the second factor token to help compromise the Gmail account.

That’s it for this week! Tune in next week for your AppSec “what you need to know” cliff notes!

Resources:

J.P. Morgan Found Hackers Through Breach of Road-Race Website

Thieves Cash Out Rewards, Points Accounts

Why Facebook Just Launched Its Own ‘Dark Web’ Site

[BugBounty] The 5000$ Google XSS

How Hackers Reportedly Side-Stepped Google’s Two-Factor Authentication

Tags: Cross Site Scripting, Google, Tor, vulnerability, web application security, web security, XSS