Technical Insight-Vulnerabilities-Web Application Security

Developers and Security Tools

A recent study from NC State states that, “the two things that were most strongly associated with using security tools were peer influence and corporate culture. As a former developer, and as someone who has reviewed the source code of countless web applications, I can say these tools are almost impossible to use for the average developer. Security tools are invariably written for security experts and consultants. Tools produce a huge percentage of false alarms – if you are lucky, you will comb through 100 false alarms to find one legitimate issue.

The false assumption here is that running a tool will result in better security. Peer pressure to do security doesn’t quite make sense because most developers are not trained in security. And since the average tool produces a large number of false alarms, and since the pressure to ship new features as quickly as possible is so high, there will never be enough time, training or background for the average developer to effectively evaluate their own security.

The “evangelist” model the study mentions does seem to work well among some of the WhiteHat Security clients. Anecdotally, I know many organizations that will accept one volunteer per security group as a security “marshall” (something similar akin to a floor “fire marshall”). That volunteer receives special security training, but ultimately acts as a bridge between his or her individual development team and the security team.

Placing the burden of security entirely on the developers is unfair, as is making them choose between fixing vulnerabilities and shipping new code. One of the dirty secrets of technology is this: even though developers often are shouldered with the responsibility of security, risk and security are really business decisions. Security is also a process that goes far beyond the development process. Developers cannot be solely responsible for application security. Business analysts, architects, developers, quality assurance, security teams, and operations all play a critical role in managing technology risk. And above all, managers (including the C-level team) must provide direction, set levels or tolerable risk, and it is ultimately responsible for making the decision to ship new code or fix vulnerabilities. That is ultimately a business decision.

Tags: application security, Vulnerabilities, whitehat security